Office Machine Servicer

Job Duties

Office machine servicers work with all types of office machinery, including copiers, adding and accounting machines, typewriters, printers, fax machines, cash registers, dictating machines, and postage meters. They inspect, maintain, and repair these machines, and they may specialize in one type of machine, machines from one manufacturer, or a variety of machines. They assemble and install office machines for clients and may train the personnel in the office in the correct use of the machines. When machines malfunction, servicers take the machine apart and inspect it for defects. They may order replacement parts if that is required.

In order to determine the correct settings for machines, office machine servicers read charts and schematics. They operate a variety of specialized tools, such as voltmeters, ohmmeters, and circuit test equipment. After they have completed their repairs and replaced parts, they reassemble the machine and test it for proper functioning. They often perform preventative maintenance to solve problems in advance and prevent breakdowns. This includes lubricating the parts to reduce the amount of wear they receive. They also adjust the components on machines to make sure they operate as efficiently as possible.

Job Skills

Office machine servicers need to have a mechanical aptitude and knowledge. They must have the ability to improvise and problem-solve on their own. They need to be able to teach office personnel the proper use of office machines. They must have the ability to see objects at close range. They must also have excellent customer service skills.


The average hourly wage of office machine servicers is about $18. Wages range from $14 to $22 per hour, and the average annual income is about $37,000. Most servicers work a typical 40 hour per week schedule. Some shops offer a great deal of overtime, and some provide transportation or reimburse employees for the use of their own vehicles. Benefits are usually determined by the size of the company for which the servicer works.

Training and Education

Many employers today require office machine servicers to have taken courses in electronics, electricity, and office machine repair, although some still do not require this. Many manufacturers train their own servicers to specialize in the repair of their machines. Employers look for applicants with mechanical aptitude and a knowledge of electronics and electricity. Some employers require applicants to pass pre-employment screening tests on these subjects. Some companies require their employees to be bondable and have a valid driver's license.

Some manufacturers and associations provide certification on products and skills. Office machine servicers will be required to continually update their skills in digital technology so that they are able to communicate effectively with computer technicians. Advancement may be limited in this occupation, usually to salary increases and additional responsibilities. Servicers can become managers of service departments. They may also be able to receive transfers to the sales departments of their employer. Visit this page about trade schools for more information on related careers.

Job Outlook

Between 2002 and 2012, employment of office machine servicers is expected to increase faster than the average. Growth will be enhanced by the constant release of new office products and technologies that need to be serviced and maintained. The growing number of home offices will also increase demand for these workers.