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Administrative Services Manager

Administrative service managers work in almost every industry coordinating and directing the support and administrative services of companies. They manage the services needed to keep an organization running smoothly and efficiently, such as data processing, records management, printing and reproduction, secretarial and reception, and security, among many others. Their specific duties depend upon their position in the management hierarchy.

First-line administrative service managers closely supervise the lower-level staff positions. Mid-level managers may supervise first-line managers, and also execute departmental planning, set goals and deadlines, and work to improve efficiency and productivity, and occasionally hire and fire employees. A small number of mid-level managers are promoted to high-level positions, such as vice president of administrative services.

Job Skills

Many skills are required of administrative service managers, the most important being the ability to communicate effectively with a diverse range of co-workers, including lower level blue-collar workers to supervisors and other managers. Administrative service managers need to be decisive, analytical, detail-oriented, and flexible. They must be able to multitask, analyze and resolve problems, and meet strict deadlines.

Income

In 2002, administrative service managers earned a median annual salary of $52,500. Earnings ranged from the lowest 10 percent, who earned less than $26,120, and the highest 10 percent, who earned more than $99,870. The following shows the median annual salaries for the industries employing the highest numbers of administrative service managers:

  • Management of companies and enterprises - $66,700
  • Elementary and secondary schools - 59,220
  • Colleges, universities, and professional schools - 56,960
  • State government - 55,710
  • Local government - 51,570

Training and Education

Often, experience is the only requirement for employment in a small organization. Larger organizations have more formal requirements for various management positions. First-line administrative service managers usually must possess an associate degree in business or management, although sometimes a high school diploma will suffice. Higher-level positions require at least a bachelor's degree and often a graduate degree in a specific field. Beyond educational background, the other major factor is work experience. Because of this, many managers work their way up to management through the lower ranks, gaining valuable experience along the way.

Employment

In 2002, approximately 52,000 people were employed as administrative service managers. About 90% worked in Federal, Sate, and local government, health service, financial service, professional, scientific, and technical services, and education. The rest worked in manufacturing.

Job Outlook

Between 2002 and 2012, the number of administrative service managers is expected to increase about as fast as the average. Competition for positions is also expected to increase, as the number of applicants exceeds the number of jobs. However, demand should be strong for facilities managers, as well as managers employed in management services and management consulting.

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